Bourride

From The Quick Recipe

Why this recipe works:

For the best bourride recipe without the bother of fish stock, we decided to coax the most flavor out of the aromatics while making a simpler broth: We pureed the onion and garlic in the food processor prior to sautéing them with orange zest and simmering the mix with parsley stems, a bay… read more

For the best bourride recipe without the bother of fish stock, we decided to coax the most flavor out of the aromatics while making a simpler broth: We pureed the onion and garlic in the food processor prior to sautéing them with orange zest and simmering the mix with parsley stems, a bay leaf, tomatoes, dry white wine, and water. Within about 20 minutes, the broth had a full, complex flavor that perfectly matched the fish, which we cut into bite-size pieces (once we’d removed the thin, dark membrane covering the fillets) and gently poached in the strained broth.

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Serves 6

Some canned tomatoes are more acidic than others. If the broth tastes too acidic, feel free to add a pinch of sugar for balance. A dry white wine such as Sauvignon Blanc works well in this recipe. If monkfish is unavailable, substitute another firm-fleshed white fish—cod, grouper, or striped bass. Thick slices of toasted baguette are ideal for soaking up the broth. Either serve them on the side or place a slice in each bowl before adding the soup. Be sure to ask your fishmonger to trim the membrane from the monkfish fillets. The broth (through step 1) can be prepared up to 2 days in advance, but the fish should be cooked just before serving, and the aïoli is best made at the last minute. To streamline your work, toast the baguette slices and make the aïoli as the broth cooks.

Ingredients

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