Greek-Style Shrimp with Tomatoes and Feta

From America's Test Kitchen Season 11: Shrimp in a Skillet

Why this recipe works:

We started our Greek-style shrimp recipe (shrimp saganaki), with jumbo or extra-large shrimp because they made peeling and deveining a relatively quick process. We used a simple marinade to give them a jump-start on flavor. Simmering the shrimp and canned diced tomatoes together allowed for an… read more

We started our Greek-style shrimp recipe (shrimp saganaki), with jumbo or extra-large shrimp because they made peeling and deveining a relatively quick process. We used a simple marinade to give them a jump-start on flavor. Simmering the shrimp and canned diced tomatoes together allowed for an exchange of flavors and a full-bodied dish. We used onion, garlic, and bell peppers for a Mediterranean sauce for our Greek-style shrimp, and then rounded it out with dry white wine and ouzo. As for the feta, we called for a generous amount in our recipe so that some would melt into the sauce as servings were spooned out and the rest would remain as a flavorful presence on top of our Greek-style shrimp and tomatoes.

less

Serves 4 to 6

This recipe works equally well with jumbo (16 to 20 per pound) or extra-large (21 to 25 per pound) shrimp, but the cooking times in step 3 will vary slightly depending on which you use. If you don’t have ouzo, see “No Ouzo?” (below) for suggested alternatives. Our preferred brand of canned diced tomatoes is Hunt’s, and our preferred brand of feta cheese is Mt. Vikos Traditional. Serve the shrimp with crusty bread or steamed white rice.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails left on, if desired (see note)
  • 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons ouzo (see note)
  • 5 medium garlic cloves, minced or pressed through garlic press (about 5 teaspoons)
  • 1 teaspoon Grated zest from 1 lemon
  • Table salt and ground black pepper
  • 1 small onion, diced medium (about 3/4 cup)
  • 1/2 medium red bell pepper, stemmed, seeded, and diced medium (about ½ cup)
  • 1/2 medium green bell pepper, stemmed, seeded, and diced medium (about ½ cup)
  • 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1 (28-ounce) can diced tomato, drained, 1/3 cup juices reserved (see note)
  • 1/4 cup dry white wine
  • 2 tablespoons coarsely chopped fresh parsley leaves
  • 6 ounces feta cheese, crumbled (about 1½ cups) (see note)
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill leaves

Instructions

  1. 1. Toss shrimp, 1 tablespoon oil, 1 tablespoon ouzo, 1 teaspoon garlic, lemon zest, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and 1/8 teaspoon black pepper in small bowl until well combined. Set aside while preparing sauce.

    2. Heat 2 tablespoons oil in 12-inch skillet over medium heat until shimmering. Add onion, red and green bell pepper, and 1/4 teaspoon salt and stir to combine. Cover skillet and cook, stirring occasionally, until vegetables release their moisture, 3 to 5 minutes. Uncover and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until moisture cooks off and vegetables have softened, about 5 minutes longer. Add remaining 4 teaspoons garlic and red pepper flakes and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add tomatoes and reserved juice, wine, and remaining 2 tablespoons ouzo; increase heat to medium-high and bring to simmer. Reduce heat to medium and simmer, stirring occasionally, until flavors have melded and sauce is slightly thickened (sauce should not be completely dry), 5 to 8 minutes. Stir in parsley and season to taste with salt and pepper.

    3. Reduce heat to medium-low and add shrimp along with any accumulated liquid to pan; stir to coat and distribute evenly. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until shrimp are opaque throughout, 6 to 9 minutes for extra-large or 7 to 11 minutes for jumbo, adjusting heat as needed to maintain bare simmer. Remove pan from heat and sprinkle evenly with feta. Drizzle remaining tablespoon oil evenly over top and sprinkle with dill. Serve immediately.

Technique

No Ouzo?

Ouzo, the popular anise-flavored spirit of Greece, lends shrimp saganaki a nuanced flavor that we like. But since ouzo is not in everyone's liquor cabinet, here are two alternatives.

PERNOD

Though slightly sweeter than ouzo, this French anise-flavored liqueur is the next best thing.

VODKA + ANISE SEEDOne tablespoon of vodka...

...plus 1/8 teaspoon of anise seed makes for a fine substitute for 1 tablespoon of ouzo.

In My Favorites
Please Wait…
Remove Favorite
Add to custom collection