Recipes
Goodbye Avocado Toast. Hello Whipped Feta Toast.
Feta dip isn’t just for dipping.
Danielle Lapierre

I love avocado toast as much as the next person. But I’ve eaten so much of it that I’m ready for something new. Ricotta is great on toast, but could we take it a step further with feta?

One of my favorite recipes is Cook’s Illustrated’s Whipped Feta Dip (start a free trial to check it out!). It’s salty, garlicky, and perfectly scoopable. So when I realized it would make the perfect candidate to top my toast, I felt like Archimedes having a eureka moment.

hand dipping pita bread into bowl of feta dip

So I gathered up my food processor and some cow’s-milk feta, which is essential to this recipe. Sheep’s-milk feta has a lower melting point and will create a runny dip. Cow’s-milk feta helps keep the dip thick but not too thick, thanks to the addition of some milk, lemon juice, and olive oil.

After combining the lemon juice and minced garlic and setting them aside, I crumbled up the feta and rinsed it in a bowl of water to remove the excess salt.

After draining the feta, I threw it in the food processor with the lemon juice mixture, added a few tablespoons of milk, and processed until it looked like ricotta. Next, I drizzled in a little olive oil as the food processor ran for a couple minutes, until the dip looked like Greek yogurt. After adding some oregano, transferring the dip to a bowl, and drizzling it with some more olive oil, I was ready to go.

This dip spread beautifully on my sourdough toast, but it’s great on multigrain bread, too. I find that the classic sourdough flavor melds perfectly with the saltiness, the garlic, and the subtle punch of lemon. Plus, the oregano adds some extra earthiness.

My favorite way to top my feta toast? A couple sprinkles of red pepper flakes, to add a little heat. It’s also nice with an egg on top or, yes, even some sliced avocado.

The best part of making this dip is that you can also eat it on its own with some pita or vegetables. And it lasts three days in the fridge—although it’ll be gone before you know it. Welcome to the feta toast era.