Brining Beef

We brine pork and chicken, but why not beef?

We brine pork and chicken, but why not beef?

We’ve found that soaking delicate, lean white meat, like pork, chicken, turkey, and even shrimp, in a salted water solution, or brine, before cooking results in moist, well-seasoned meat. So why not give beef the same treatment? In general, beef has a higher fat content than lean white meat, so it doesn’t need the brine to remain juicy. Secondly, quick-cooking, tender beef cuts such as strip steaks or tenderloin roasts should ideally be cooked only to about 125 degrees (for medium-rare). In comparison, pork and chicken require a higher cooking temperature (145 for pork, 160 for white meat poultry and 170 for dark meat poultry) and are, therefore, in greater danger of drying out. Tougher cuts of beef, such as chuck roast or brisket, are cooked to more than 200 degrees, but their extensive marbling of fat and collagen melts and acts as a natural moisturizer.

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