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Science

How to Use Shrimp Shells to Make Stock

Restaurant chefs have long saved shrimp shells for stock in much the same way they do beef and chicken bones.
By Published Aug. 21, 2019

When cooking with shrimp it's easy to view the shell as simply an impediment to accessing the sweet, briny flesh inside. The wide availability of peeled shrimp suggests many cooks avoid dealing with it altogether. But to overlook these crustaceans' exoskeletons is to take a pass on a considerable amount of flavor. Calling for shell-on shrimp allows us to pull a range of enticing flavor compounds into a dish—but we wanted to know the ideal length of time to cook shrimp shells for the best flavor and aroma. We designed an experiment for simmering shrimp shells to determine just that.

Experiment

We simmered batches of shrimp shells (each batch contained the shells from 1½ pounds of large shrimp, or 4 ounces of shells) in 1½ cups of water, covered, for 5, 10, 15, and 30 minutes. After simmering, we strained the shell broth. To eliminate the chance that any flavor concentration resulted from evaporation, we added water back into the longer-cooked samples so that all samples were the same volume. Samples were tasted warm (160 degrees) and tasters were asked to comment on the intensity of the shrimp flavor of each sample. We repeated the test three times, each time with a different set of tasters.

Results

To our surprise, tasters almost unanimously chose the 5- and 10-minute simmered samples as “more potent,” “shrimpier,” and “more aromatic” than the 15- and 30-minute simmered samples. By analyzing the rankings from each round of testing we found an inverse relationship between cooking time and shrimp flavor intensity.

Takeaway

While it may seem counterintuitive that a shorter simmering time produces a more intensely flavored stock, a closer look provides a clear explanation. While some savory compounds found in shrimp shells, such as glutamic acid and the free nucleotide inosine monophosphate (IMP), are nonvolatile (they stay in the stock, rather than release into the atmosphere), our experiment shows that the compounds that we associate with shrimp flavor are highly volatile. Shrimp shells contain about 10 percent by weight polyunsaturated fatty acids that quickly oxidize during cooking into low-molecular-weight aldehydes, alcohols, and ketones. These low-molecular-weight molecules rapidly release into the air, providing a pleasant aroma during cooking, but leaving behind a bland broth. So to get the most out of your shrimp shells, remember that longer isn't better: Keep your simmering time to 5 minutes for the best shrimp flavor.

Shrimp Shells: When is their Flavor Best?

You might think that simmering shrimp shells for longer would make a more flavorful stock, but that is incorrect. The compounds associated with shrimp flavor are very volatile, so a shorter simmer is in fact better. The best time? Only 5 minutes.

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JC
JOHN C.
16 days

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too. I've done this using a rimmed sheet pan instead of a skillet and put veggies and potatoes around the chicken for a one-pan meal. Broccoli gets nicely browned and yummy!

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too.

MD
MILES D.
JOHN C.
9 days

Amazed this recipe works out as well as it does. Would not have thought that the amount of time under the broiler would have produced a very juicy and favorable chicken with a very crispy crust. Used my 12" Lodge Cast Iron skillet (which can withstand 1000 degree temps to respond to those who wondered if it would work) and it turned out great. A "make again" as my family rates things. This is a great recipe, and I will definitely make it again. My butcher gladly butterflied the chicken for me, therefore I found it to be a fast and easy prep. I used my cast iron skillet- marvellous!

CM
CHARLES M.
11 days

John, wasn't it just amazing chicken? So much better than your typical oven baked chicken and on par if not better than gas or even charcoal grilled. It gets that smokey charcoal tasted and overnight koshering definitely helps, something I do when time permits. First-time I've pierced a whole chicken minus the times I make jerk chicken on the grill. Yup, the cast iron was not an issue.