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Tangzhong: The Brilliant Secret to Moist Breads that Keep for Days

Sneak more liquid into your dough.
By Published Dec. 16, 2021

How do you make breads, rolls, and buns moister, fluffier, and longer-lasting in one simple step? Use the baking technique known as tangzhong that was popularized by Taiwanese pastry chef Yvonne Chen in the early 2000s but actually originated in Japan in the 1800s. Thanks to Chen, the technique is commonly called by its Chinese name, tangzhong.

Tangzhong, Defined

The term, which loosely translates as “hot-water roux,” refers to a pudding‑like mixture made by cooking a small amount of flour in water until the two form a gel. Mixing that gel into the rest of the dough ingredients enables the baker to add a high proportion of water without making the dough unworkably soft and sticky, because some of the water is effectively “locked away” in the gel. When the baked good hits the oven, that abundance of water turns to steam and inflates the dough, making it light and soft. The gel also extends the shelf life of baked goods, so they remain moist for days. 

Tangzhong in Our Recipes

We first used the technique in our Fluffy Dinner Rolls recipe to produce rolls with a particularly moist, airy, feathery crumb that stayed fresh and soft longer than conventional rolls. Next, we incorporated tangzhong into our Sticky Buns for an easy-to-work-with dough that produced light, moist treats without too much richness. And it was really useful in Easy-Braid Challah, because stickiness is a detriment when braiding the dough. We’ve also had great success using the technique in Oatmeal Dinner Rolls as well as in Kanelbullar (Swedish Cinnamon Buns).

How to Make and Use Tangzhong

In many recipes that employ the tangzhong method, the paste is about 5 parts liquid to 1 part flour and makes up 15 to 20 percent of the total dough weight. Here's the basic process. 

1. Whisk the water and and the flour together in a small bowl until no lumps remain.

2. Microwave the mixture, whisking every 20 seconds, until it thickens to stiff, smooth, pudding-like consistency that forms a mound when dropped from the end of the whisk into a bowl.

3. Combine the tangzhong with the remaining ingredients to create the dough.

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JC
JOHN C.
16 days

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too. I've done this using a rimmed sheet pan instead of a skillet and put veggies and potatoes around the chicken for a one-pan meal. Broccoli gets nicely browned and yummy!

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too.

MD
MILES D.
JOHN C.
9 days

Amazed this recipe works out as well as it does. Would not have thought that the amount of time under the broiler would have produced a very juicy and favorable chicken with a very crispy crust. Used my 12" Lodge Cast Iron skillet (which can withstand 1000 degree temps to respond to those who wondered if it would work) and it turned out great. A "make again" as my family rates things. This is a great recipe, and I will definitely make it again. My butcher gladly butterflied the chicken for me, therefore I found it to be a fast and easy prep. I used my cast iron skillet- marvellous!

CM
CHARLES M.
11 days

John, wasn't it just amazing chicken? So much better than your typical oven baked chicken and on par if not better than gas or even charcoal grilled. It gets that smokey charcoal tasted and overnight koshering definitely helps, something I do when time permits. First-time I've pierced a whole chicken minus the times I make jerk chicken on the grill. Yup, the cast iron was not an issue.