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Cooking Tips

Is Your Dish Too Salty? Sweet? Sour? Spicy? Here's How to Fix It.

We have some simple corrections that can come to your rescue when seasonings go awry.
By Published July 4, 2022

When it comes to seasoning food, it pays to go slowly: If you’ve added too much salt, sweetener, or spice to a dish, the damage is usually done.

In mild cases, however, the overpowering ingredient can sometimes be masked by the addition of another ingredient from the opposite end of the flavor spectrum. 

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On a simple sensory level (on the tongue), this works because there are specific interactions between taste stimuli that enhance or suppress each other. These are very case-specific; e.g., bitterness is suppressed by saltiness, but not vice versa.

There's also a more general effect that can happen on the central processing level called mixture suppression: When we experience two (or more) tastes simultaneously, the intensity is less than if we experienced one taste on its own.

Preventing Overly Seasoned Food 

To avoid overly seasoned food in the first place, it's important to account for the reduction of liquids when seasoning a dish—a perfectly seasoned stew, for example, will likely taste too salty after several hours of simmering. Your best bet is to season with a light hand during the cooking process and then taste your food and adjust the seasoning just before serving.

If things still go awry, consult the following tips for ideas. 

How to Make Food Less Salty

Consider adding a little water if your soup, sauce or stew is overreduced. You can also try adding an acid such as vinegar; lemon or lime juice; canned, unsalted tomatoes; or a sweetener such as sugar, honey, or maple syrup.

How to Make Food Less Sweet

Add an acid or seasonings such as vinegar or citrus juice; chopped fresh herbs; a dash of cayenne pepper; or, for sweet dishes, a bit of liqueur or espresso powder.

How to Make Food Less Spicy

Add a sweetener such as sugar, honey, or maple syrup.

How to Make Food Less Acidic

Add a fat such as butter, heavy cream, sour cream, cheese, or olive oil to coat the tongue and physically block some of the acidity from your taste buds. You might also try adding a sweetener such as sugar, honey, or maple syrup.

How to Make Food Less Bitter

Add salt or an acid such as vinegar or lemon juice

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JC
JOHN C.
16 days

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too. I've done this using a rimmed sheet pan instead of a skillet and put veggies and potatoes around the chicken for a one-pan meal. Broccoli gets nicely browned and yummy!

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too.

MD
MILES D.
JOHN C.
9 days

Amazed this recipe works out as well as it does. Would not have thought that the amount of time under the broiler would have produced a very juicy and favorable chicken with a very crispy crust. Used my 12" Lodge Cast Iron skillet (which can withstand 1000 degree temps to respond to those who wondered if it would work) and it turned out great. A "make again" as my family rates things. This is a great recipe, and I will definitely make it again. My butcher gladly butterflied the chicken for me, therefore I found it to be a fast and easy prep. I used my cast iron skillet- marvellous!

CM
CHARLES M.
11 days

John, wasn't it just amazing chicken? So much better than your typical oven baked chicken and on par if not better than gas or even charcoal grilled. It gets that smokey charcoal tasted and overnight koshering definitely helps, something I do when time permits. First-time I've pierced a whole chicken minus the times I make jerk chicken on the grill. Yup, the cast iron was not an issue.