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At the Pub, It’s All Gravy (Served Over Bangers and Mash)

Bangers and mash may be the meat and potatoes, but this cozy Brit classic hangs on the onion gravy.
By Published Dec. 5, 2022

The plot of “The Third Ingredient,” a short story by 19th-century author William Sydney Porter (widely known as O. Henry), revolves around a trio of downtrodden boardinghouse tenants who collectively make the most out of not much. But really, the tale is about the vitalness of onions.

“A stew without an onion is worse’n a matinee without candy,” laments Hetty, the protagonist who obsesses over the allium deficiency in her meat-and-potatoes boil. Without it, she says, “it ain’t got any soul.” 

Truer words have never been said about what onions can do for a sauce—especially when it’s the gravy poured over bangers and mash. Rich in color, body, and savoriness, onion gravy is what merges the plump sausages and buttery spuds into the cozy British pub staple that this dish is. 

If you’ve ever caramelized onions, you know it takes a bit of coaxing for them to go from sharp and crunchy to silky and sweet‑savory, so I slice them thin for maximum heat exposure and add them to the skillet as soon as the fresh, lightly spiced Cumberland links (the traditional choice, though bratwurst also works well) start to brown. Then I drizzle in some water and cover the pan, harnessing steam power to gently cook the sausages and wilt the onions. Once the links are cooked through, I set them aside while the onions keep going. Eventually, the water evaporates and the onions caramelize, building up a deep, dark, meaty fond on the bottom of the pan. 

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The Evolution of Great Gravy

Of course the sausages should be succulent and the potatoes buttery, but it’s the onion gravy that makes or breaks this dish. Here’s mine: a glossy, ultrasavory number that builds up flavor during three stages.

STEAM the onions with the sausages to help them collapse. 

SAUTÉ them until well browned and a meaty fond forms in the pan.

SIMMER them in seasoned beef broth until the gravy has reduced.

To capture every bit of that savory flavor base, I deglaze the pan with beef broth that I season with dry mustard; rosemary; thyme; and Marmite, the glutamate-rich British yeast extract that infuses the gravy with meaty, fussed‑over flavor. A brief cook softens the onions and concentrates the gravy even more. 

Finally, to achieve the requisite body and gloss, I add a cornstarch slurry and a few knobs of butter, whisked in off the heat. I brighten the sauce with vinegar and spoon it over the links and mash. Savory? Check. Cozy? Check. Soul-satisfying? You bet. 

Bangers with Onion Gravy

Bangers and mash may be the meat and potatoes, but this cozy Brit classic hangs on the onion gravy.
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JC
JOHN C.
16 days

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too. I've done this using a rimmed sheet pan instead of a skillet and put veggies and potatoes around the chicken for a one-pan meal. Broccoli gets nicely browned and yummy!

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too.

MD
MILES D.
JOHN C.
9 days

Amazed this recipe works out as well as it does. Would not have thought that the amount of time under the broiler would have produced a very juicy and favorable chicken with a very crispy crust. Used my 12" Lodge Cast Iron skillet (which can withstand 1000 degree temps to respond to those who wondered if it would work) and it turned out great. A "make again" as my family rates things. This is a great recipe, and I will definitely make it again. My butcher gladly butterflied the chicken for me, therefore I found it to be a fast and easy prep. I used my cast iron skillet- marvellous!

CM
CHARLES M.
11 days

John, wasn't it just amazing chicken? So much better than your typical oven baked chicken and on par if not better than gas or even charcoal grilled. It gets that smokey charcoal tasted and overnight koshering definitely helps, something I do when time permits. First-time I've pierced a whole chicken minus the times I make jerk chicken on the grill. Yup, the cast iron was not an issue.