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Chinois Sieves

For straining stocks or sauces, we reach for a bowl-shaped fine-mesh strainer, but would a chinois, a traditional conical French sieve with ultra–finely woven mesh, give smoother results?

What We Learned

When a stock, sauce, or puree needs straining, most of us reach for a bowl-shaped fine-mesh strainer. Many restaurant chefs, though, prefer to use a conical, ultrafine-mesh sieve called a chinois, a traditional French kitchen tool. Would a tightly woven chinois (also called a bouillon strainer) give us smoother results? We chose three cone-shaped sieves priced from under $40 to more...

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