Apple Corers

From Pork and Pears

Apple Corers

How We Tested

An apple corer should make fast work of prepping the fruit, with a sharp-edged metal barrel that tunnels out the core with the twist of the wrist. But if the edge doesn’t easily pierce the apple, or if the core gets jammed in the barrel, you might wish you’d used a knife instead. So when we noticed a slew of new corers claiming to make the task easier, we used six (priced from $8.99 to $23.90), as well as our old favorite model from OXO ($8.99), to core bushels of tall, crunchy, and irregularly shaped apples.

All but one of the barrel edges are sharp and serrated and so pierced effortlessly into the apples. The lone outlier failed at this basic task because its cutting edge is not only smooth, so it struggled to break the skin, but also slanted, which caused it to slide on the apple’s exterior and cut an off-center hole.

The diameter and design of the barrel determined how thoroughly it removed the core—and how readily it released it. Barrels that measured 3/4 to 1 inch across re...

How We Tested

An apple corer should make fast work of prepping the fruit, with a sharp-edged metal barrel that tunnels out the core with the twist of the wrist. But if the edge doesn’t easily pierce the apple, or if the core gets jammed in the barrel, you might wish you’d used a knife instead. So when we noticed a slew of new corers claiming to make the task easier, we used six (priced from $8.99 to $23.90), as well as our old favorite model from OXO ($8.99), to core bushels of tall, crunchy, and irregularly shaped apples.

All but one of the barrel edges are sharp and serrated and so pierced effortlessly into the apples. The lone outlier failed at this basic task because its cutting edge is not only smooth, so it struggled to break the skin, but also slanted, which caused it to slide on the apple’s exterior and cut an off-center hole.

The diameter and design of the barrel determined how thoroughly it removed the core—and how readily it released it. Barrels that measured 3/4 to 1 inch across removed cores and seeds in one fell swoop without taking off too much edible flesh, while narrower models left behind bits of inedible core, seed, and stem. How easy or difficult it was to release the extracted core, meanwhile, depended on two features: the length of the collar—the ring of metal on the business end of the barrel that grips the extracted core—and, on some models, innovative features that promised to eject the core. In general, shorter collars made the job easier, as longer pieces of metal trapped the core. Innovative core-release functions were hit or miss. The twist-and-push mechanism on one model often slid down the handle, interfering as we tried to push the barrel through the fruit. Two others sported a hinge that let the barrel open to release the core. The tiny clasp on one corer would come undone spontaneously, springing apart and flinging apple pieces across the counter. But the hinged barrel on another stayed securely in the “closed” position and opens with the press of an easy-to-control lever. That feature, plus its sharp teeth, wide barrel, and comfortable handle made our winner extremely user-friendly—and gave it an edge over our previous favorite from OXO.

Watch the Full Episode

Season 16, Ep. 12
Pork and PearsSeason 16, Ep. 12

Test cook Bridget Lancaster reveals the secrets to making the best Milk-Braised Pork Loin. Then, tasting expert Jack Bishop conducts a tasting of apricot preserves. Next, gadget guru Lisa McManus unco...