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Smashed Potatoes

Why This Recipe Works

For our smashed potato recipe, we were after chunks of potato bound by a rich, creamy puree. Red Bliss potatoes were the best choice for smashing since their compact structure held up well under pressure. Wanting a tangy yet creamy substance that would bind the potatoes in terms of both flavor and texture, we combined 1/2 cup of cream cheese with 4 tablespoons of melted butter and some reserved potato cooking water; we added the mixture to the quickly drying smash, bringing it to a unified and creamy consistency.

Ingredients

Print Shopping List

2 pounds Red Bliss potatoes (about 2 inches in diameter), unpeeled and scrubbed
Table salt
1 bay leaf
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and warm
½ cup cream cheese (4 ounces), at room temperature
Ground black pepper
3 tablespoons chopped fresh chives (optional)
Nutritional Information

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION

Per Serving (Serves 4)

  • Calories 379
  • Cholesterol 62 mg
  • Fat 21 g
  • Sodium 635 mg
  • Saturated 12 g
  • Carbs 41 g
  • Trans 0 g
  • Dietary Fiber 5 g
  • Monounsaturated 5 g
  • Sugar 2 g
  • Polyunsaturated 0 g
  • Protein 6 g

The information shown is Edamam’s estimate based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.

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Instructions

Serves 4 to 6

White potatoes can be used instead of Red Bliss, but their skins lack the rosy color of Red Bliss skins. Try to get potatoes of equal size; if that's not possible, test the larger potatoes for doneness. If only larger potatoes are available, increase the cooking time by about 10 minutes. Check for doneness with a paring knife.

1. Place potatoes in large saucepan and cover with 1 inch cold water; add 1 teaspoon salt and bay leaf. Bring to boil over high heat, then reduce heat to medium-low and simmer gently until paring knife can be inserted into potatoes with no resistance, 35 to 45 minutes. Reserve 1/2 cup cooking water, then drain potatoes. Return potatoes to pot, discard bay, and allow potatoes to stand in pot, uncovered, until surfaces are dry, about 5 minutes.

2. While potatoes dry, whisk melted butter and softened cream cheese in medium bowl until smooth and fully incorporated. Add 1/4 cup of reserved cooking water, 1/2 teaspoon pepper, chives (if using), and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Using rubber spatula or back of wooden spoon, smash potatoes just enough to break skins. Fold in butter/cream cheese mixture until most of liquid has been absorbed and chunks of potatoes remain. Add more cooking water 1 tablespoon at a time as needed, until potatoes are slightly looser than desired (potatoes will thicken slightly with standing). Adjust seasonings with salt and pepper; serve immediately.

TO MAKE AHEAD: The potatoes are best made just before serving, though see the related Quick Tip for a suggestion on how to hold mashed potatoes.

TO DOUBLE: The Smashed Potatoes recipe and variation can easily be doubled to serve 8 to 12. To accommodate the increased volume, you will need to cook the potatoes in a Dutch oven or stockpot instead of the specified saucepan. Depending on pot size, the cooking time will increase by 5 to 10 minutes.

Step-by-Step

Making Smashed Potatoes

1. For the best flavor and texture, boil whole, skin on potatoes. Leave a measuring cup nearby as a reminder to reserve some cooking liquid.

2. While the potatoes are drying, whisk together the cream cheese and butter.

3. When smashing the potatoes, use a spatula or large wooden spoon; both work better than a potato masher or a fork. Smash just until the skins are broken.

4. Fold the cream cheese mixture into the potatoes gently, adding more reserved cooking liquid if the potatoes look dry.

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JC
JOHN C.
16 days

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too. I've done this using a rimmed sheet pan instead of a skillet and put veggies and potatoes around the chicken for a one-pan meal. Broccoli gets nicely browned and yummy!

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too.

MD
MILES D.
JOHN C.
9 days

Amazed this recipe works out as well as it does. Would not have thought that the amount of time under the broiler would have produced a very juicy and favorable chicken with a very crispy crust. Used my 12" Lodge Cast Iron skillet (which can withstand 1000 degree temps to respond to those who wondered if it would work) and it turned out great. A "make again" as my family rates things. This is a great recipe, and I will definitely make it again. My butcher gladly butterflied the chicken for me, therefore I found it to be a fast and easy prep. I used my cast iron skillet- marvellous!

CM
CHARLES M.
11 days

John, wasn't it just amazing chicken? So much better than your typical oven baked chicken and on par if not better than gas or even charcoal grilled. It gets that smokey charcoal tasted and overnight koshering definitely helps, something I do when time permits. First-time I've pierced a whole chicken minus the times I make jerk chicken on the grill. Yup, the cast iron was not an issue.

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