Lattice-Top Fresh Peach Pie

From the episode Peach Pie

Why This Recipe Works

Fresh peach pies are often soupy or overly sweet, with a bottom crust that is soggy or undercooked. We wanted to create a filling that was juicy but not swimming in liquid, its flavors neither muscled out by spices nor overwhelmed by thicke...

Why This Recipe Works

Fresh peach pies are often soupy or overly sweet, with a bottom crust that is soggy or undercooked. We wanted to create a filling that was juicy but not swimming in liquid, its flavors neither muscled out by spices nor overwhelmed by thickeners, and we wanted a crust that was well browned on the bottom.

We peeled and sliced the peaches and found that all they needed in the way of flavor was sugar, lemon juice, cinnamon, nutmeg, and a dash of salt. To thicken the juices, we used a little cornstarch, but still, we needed to do more. A lattice-top pie crust was our solution—while it requires a bit more work than making a regular double-crust pie, we found that it’s worth the effort. Not only is it pretty and very traditional on peach pies, but it serves an important purpose: The structure of a lattice top allows for maximum evaporation while the pie cooks—the juices released by the fruit cook down slowly while baking so the filling isn’t soupy. For easy assembly, we rolled and cut the dough, then froze it so the strips were firm and easy to handle.

Lattice-Top Fresh Peach Pie