Roasted Bone-In Chicken Breasts

From Back to Basics

Why This Recipe Works

Bone-in chicken breasts roasted at a high temperature may have crispy, brown skin, but it often conceals dry, bland meat. A lower temperature keeps the meat juicy but leaves the skin pale and flabby. For the best of both worlds, we adapt a ...

Why This Recipe Works

Bone-in chicken breasts roasted at a high temperature may have crispy, brown skin, but it often conceals dry, bland meat. A lower temperature keeps the meat juicy but leaves the skin pale and flabby. For the best of both worlds, we adapt a cooking technique that is more commonly used for steaks: reverse searing.

We start by applying salt under the skin to season the meat and help it retain moisture. Then we poke small holes in the skin to help drain excess fat. Gently baking the breasts at 325 degrees minimizes moisture loss and results in even cooking from the breasts’ thick ends to their thin ends. It also allows the surface of the skin to dry out so that a quick sear in a hot skillet is all that is required for a crackly, burnished finish. And since the cooking method is pretty much hands-off, there’s time to make a quick sauce to serve alongside.

Roasted Bone-In Chicken Breasts