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Cast Iron Crispy Pan-Fried Pork Chops with Succotash

Why This Recipe Works

When they're done right, pan-fried pork chops feature a crisp exterior and moist, juicy meat. When handled poorly, you get a soggy, messy coating and bland, overcooked pork. Pan frying in a cast-iron skillet helps solve these problems because the heavy pan helps maintain a constant frying temperature for even cooking. To fix the breading, we used buttermilk for a light texture and tangy flavor, plus garlic and mustard. Crushed cornflakes added a desirable cragginess. To ensure that the breading adhered to the chops, we lightly scored the meat before breading and gave it a short rest before adding the chops to the pan. Succotash, the classic American vegetable blend of lima beans, corn, and bell pepper, was the perfect complement for our pork chops. Zucchini added an extra layer of freshness.

3 cups (3 ounces) cornflakes
cup cornstarch
1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme
Salt and pepper
¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 cup buttermilk
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
2 garlic cloves, minced
4 (6- to 8-ounce) boneless pork chop, 3/4 to 1 inch thick
½ cup vegetable oil
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 zucchini, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
1 red bell pepper, stemmed, seeded, and cut into 1/2-inch pieces
1 small onion, chopped fine
1 ½ cups frozen baby lima beans, thawed
1 ½ cups frozen corn, thawed
1 tablespoon minced fresh tarragon
Nutritional Information

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Instructions

Serves 4

You can substitute 3/4 cup of store-bought cornflake crumbs for the whole cornflakes. If using store-bought crumbs, omit the processing step and mix the crumbs with the cornstarch, salt, and pepper. Serve with lemon wedges.

1. Process cornflakes, 1/3 cup cornstarch, thyme, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/2 teaspoon pepper, and cayenne in food processor until cornflakes are finely ground, about 10 seconds; transfer to shallow dish. Spread remaining 1/3 cup cornstarch in second shallow dish. In third shallow dish whisk buttermilk, mustard, and half of garlic together until combined.

2. Adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 200 degrees. With sharp knife, cut 1/16-inch-deep slits on both sides of chops, spaced 1/2 inch apart, in crosshatch pattern. Season chops with salt and pepper. Working with 1 chop at a time, dredge chops in cornstarch, dip in buttermilk mixture, then coat with cornflake mixture, pressing gently to adhere. Transfer coated chops to plate and let sit for 10 minutes.

3. Set wire rack in rimmed baking sheet and line with triple layer of paper towels. Heat oil in 12-inch cast-iron skillet over medium heat until shimmering. Place chops in skillet and cook until golden brown and crisp on first side, about 5 minutes. Carefully flip chops, reduce heat to medium-low, and continue to cook until golden brown and crisp on second side and pork registers 145 degrees, about 5 minutes. Transfer chops to prepared rack and keep warm in oven.

4. Discard oil and wipe skillet clean with paper towels. Melt 1 tablespoon butter in now-empty skillet over medium heat. Add zucchini, bell pepper, onion, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Stir in lima beans, corn, and remaining garlic and cook until heated through, about 5 minutes. Off heat, stir in remaining 1 tablespoon butter and tarragon and season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve chops with succotash.

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JC
JOHN C.
16 days

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too. I've done this using a rimmed sheet pan instead of a skillet and put veggies and potatoes around the chicken for a one-pan meal. Broccoli gets nicely browned and yummy!

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It's the only way I'll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess - perfect every time. I've used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too.

MD
MILES D.
JOHN C.
9 days

Amazed this recipe works out as well as it does. Would not have thought that the amount of time under the broiler would have produced a very juicy and favorable chicken with a very crispy crust. Used my 12" Lodge Cast Iron skillet (which can withstand 1000 degree temps to respond to those who wondered if it would work) and it turned out great. A "make again" as my family rates things. This is a great recipe, and I will definitely make it again. My butcher gladly butterflied the chicken for me, therefore I found it to be a fast and easy prep. I used my cast iron skillet- marvellous!

CM
CHARLES M.
11 days

John, wasn't it just amazing chicken? So much better than your typical oven baked chicken and on par if not better than gas or even charcoal grilled. It gets that smokey charcoal tasted and overnight koshering definitely helps, something I do when time permits. First-time I've pierced a whole chicken minus the times I make jerk chicken on the grill. Yup, the cast iron was not an issue.