Menu
Search
Menu
Close

Supermarket Honey

How we tested

America has a sky-high demand for honey: According to the National Honey Board, we eat more than 400 million pounds of the stuff every year. Considering that the average honeybee produces only 1/12 of a teaspoon of honey over its lifetime, that’s a lot of honey . . . and a lot of bees.

To keep up with the demand, manufacturers source honey from all over the country and globe. Today, the average jar of honey on supermarket shelves is actually a mix of honeys from many hives that’s been carefully blended and processed to engineer a preferred flavor and color. (“Single-source” honeys, or honeys from a single hive, are a different breed entirely.)

Most supermarket honey is processed one of two ways. Traditional honey is usually heated to thin it enough so that it can pass under high pressure through fine strainers to remove pollen and give the honey a clear appearance, which many consumers prefer. Raw honey, by contrast, is usually only heated high enough (about 120 degrees) to prevent it from crystallizing on store shelves. The honey is then lightly strained to remove debris and leftover wax, but it’s not filtered under high pressure and retains most of its pollen.

To find the best supermarket honey, we selected five top-selling honeys—three traditional and two raw. Twenty-one America’s Test Kitchen staffers tried each product plain and in honey cake.

In both tastings, we universally preferred the two raw honeys, calling them “complex,” with “slight bitterness” and “strong floral notes.” Traditional honeys, by contrast, were “one-note” and “aggressively sweet.” Some were so “cloying” that tasters thought the samples were corn syrup. What accounts for the flavor difference between traditional honey and raw honey?

Our science editor explained that pollen contains alkaloids and phenolics—chemicals that add complex, slightly bitter flavors. Tasters liked how these tempered the sweetness of honey. The fact that raw honey is also heated more gently likely helps preserve its delicate, nuanced flavors. These flavors showed through when we used the honey as an ingredient in cake, too: Tasters deemed cake made with raw honey “more complex” and more “distinctly honey flavored” than products made with traditional brands.

Flavor is also influenced by what the bees feed on. While bees are free to fly wherever they like, most manufacturers list the primary diet of their bees on honey jars. The traditional honeys in our lineup were primarily sourced from clover-eating bees, while the raw brands were mixtures from bees that feasted on all sorts of grasses and flowers. Tasters noted strong floral and grassy notes in raw honeys that stood in contrast to the milder flavors of clover honey.

So when shopping for honey, look for the word “raw” on the label and choose a product that comes from bees with a varied diet. Our favorite product sources its honey from bees that feed on a blend of wildflowers, clover, Chinese tallow, and vetch; it was slightly bitter and floral, with a deep, balanced sweetness.

Methodology

Twenty-one America’s Test Kitchen staffers tried each product plain and in honey cake.

The Results

Note: America's Test Kitchen continuously updates our equipment reviews and taste tests. The written content below is the most up-to-date information available and may not match what appears in the video segment.

Winner
Recommended

Nature Nate’s 100% Pure Raw and Unfiltered Honey

$12.63 for 16 oz ($0.79 per oz)*

Nature Nate’s 100% Pure Raw and Unfiltered Honey

This raw honey had “big flowery flavor,” with “rich,” “bold” notes of “citrus,” “clover,” and “anise.” Tasters loved this “complex” product’s “mild” sweetness and “slight acidity,” which added “brightness” to honey cake.

More Details
$12.63 for 16 oz ($0.79 per oz)*
Recommended

Aunt Sue’s Raw-Wild Honey

$8.92 for 16 oz ($0.56 per oz)*

Aunt Sue’s Raw-Wild Honey

“Sweet” and “smoky,” this raw wildflower honey balanced “nutty” notes of “caramel” and “cocoa” with “spicy,” “herby,” “floral” flavors. Tasters liked the “hint of bitterness” in this honey, which tempered the sweetness of the cake.

More Details
$8.92 for 16 oz ($0.56 per oz)*

Sue Bee Clover Honey

$3.54 for 8 oz ($0.44 per oz)*

Sue Bee Clover Honey

This “light,” “mild” honey was “sweet” and “fruity” with just a touch of bitterness. Though some tasters found this offering “a tad boring” when sampled on its own, most enjoyed its “delicate,” “mellow” sweetness in honey cake.

More Details
$3.54 for 8 oz ($0.44 per oz)*
Recommended with Reservations

Burleson’s Pure Clover Honey

$5.98 for 24 oz ($0.25 per oz)*

Burleson’s Pure Clover Honey

Though many tasters equated this product’s “supersweet,” “pure sugar” flavor with the “classic,” “traditional honey profile,” others thought this honey was “one note” and “cloyingly sweet.” In cake, most found it “a touch bland,” but otherwise “just fine.”

More Details
$5.98 for 24 oz ($0.25 per oz)*

Gunter’s Pure Clover Honey

$7.59 for 12 oz ($0.63 per oz)*

Gunter’s Pure Clover Honey

Tasters didn’t mind this “supersweet” honey as an ingredient in cake, but when sampled plain it was “one-dimensional,” “toothache-inducing,” and “overpoweringly sweet.” “Is this corn syrup?” asked one taster.

More Details
$7.59 for 12 oz ($0.63 per oz)*